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PBPC Newsletter May 6, 2020


Welcome to the Plant Based Products CouncilNewsletter! Read on for the latest in PBPC news and activities, as well as some of the amazing innovations, trends, and developments happening right now in the sustainability and bioeconomy world! If you missed our last edition, check it out using the link below. 

PBPC Newsletter April 23, 2020

INTERNATIONAL COMPOSTING AWARENESS WEEK

This week, PBPC is celebrating International Compost Awareness Week (ICAW) 2020. ICAW is the largest and most comprehensive education initiative of the compost industry, and this year’s theme is “Soil Loves Compost.”

Composting is a critical component of the circular bioeconomy for many plant-based products. When compared to landfill, composting offers reduced solid waste, greenhouse gas emissions, and water pollution, while also creating healthy soil for new plant feedstocks. Help us celebrate this important week and raise awareness by promoting composting across your social media channels.

ICAW 2020Composting Council
Social Media ToolkitPBPC materials for you to repurpose
PBPC webpageComposting
PBPC InterviewThe East Coast’s largest commercial composter

THE DEBATE: CORPORATIONS, SUSTAINABILITY & COVID

No one can be sure how COVID will impact future business practices and consumer habits. But we’re reading competing predictions. First, the WSJ discusses how corporate C-Suites are re-examining sustainability matters in the short term, often sacrificing those initiatives. Second, Bloomberg Law suggests circular economies will grow stronger in the wake of the pandemic. And third, PepsiCo’s Chief Sustainability Officer urges a long-term outlook.

Wall Street JournalSustainability Was Corporate America’s Buzzword. This Crisis Changes That.
Bloomberg LawCircular Economies May Rise From The Pandemic
Green BizPepsiCo CSO: We Can’t ‘Lose Sight’ Of The Long-Term Crisis

THE DEBATE PART TWO: HARVARD WEIGHS IN

The Harvard Business Review is one of the most respected journals in business, so when they publish a piece that suggests companies need to address plastic, we should all take note. This article offers five compelling arguments that show how companies can benefit from plastic waste reduction. 

Harvard Business ReviewWhy Plastic Waste Is A C-Suite Issue

NEW CONSUMER INNOVATIONS & PRODUCTS WE LOVE

We have a fabulous list of plant-based advancements in this issue, with P&G Beauty testing a paper deodorant package for major brands, fashion powerhouse Burberry highlighting the sustainability of their products in their labels and tags, Mattel announcing new sugarcane-based plastic toys for Earth Day, and a host of fashion brands – including H&M, Little Emperor, Faire Child and Hanna Andersson — upping their sustainability game. Finally, last issue we saluted Allbirds for their new labelling, but they’re at it again with the first plant-based running shoe.

Beauty PackagingP&G Beauty Tests All-Paper Deodorant Tube
WWDBurberry To Introduce Sustainability Labels To Its Products
The Toy BookMattel Launches Sugarcane-Based Toys For Earth Day
WWDSustainable Children’s Labels Look Ahead
Evening StandardSustainable Sneaker Brand Allbirds Debuts Its First Running Shoe

SOURCING INNOVATIONS IN OUR PLANT BASED WORLD

To ensure we see more of the great products above, we need continued innovation at the beginning of our value chain. Among our favorite links below: a 16-year-old has created an eco-friendly bioplastic made of prawn shells and silk cocoons, which decomposes in 30 days. Varden has a created new paper packaging from plant waste, earning $2 million in funding. Nestlé will co-fund a new Chair for Sustainable Materials at an institute in Switzerland. Research will focus on sustainable materials as alternative packaging to enable the reduction of waste.

ForbesPaper From Plant Waste Can Replace Plastics: Varden Startup Receives $2M Boost
India Today16-Year-Old Makes Eco-Friendly Plastic From Prawn Shells
CosmeticsDesign-Europe.comBlue Biotech Can Unlock ‘Considerable’ Ocean Potential
New FoodNestlé To Co-Fund Sustainable Materials Research To Tackle Plastic Waste
Kraton Press ReleaseNew Cirkular+™ Product Line For Plastics Upcycling And Circular Solutions

OUR NEW, FAVORITE STATISTICS

74% of consumers are willing to pay more for sustainable packaging, says the latest research from Trivium Packaging and Boston Consulting Group, and 25% of those are happy to pay 10% more. Meanwhile, PMMI, the Association for Packaging and Processing Technologies, unveiled research based on 60 industry interviews finding that packaging sustainability has moved beyond a trend and is now a global shift. The report estimates the global sustainable packaging market was $220 billion in 2018 and will be $280 billion by 2025. 

Recycling MagazineSustainable Packaging: Consumers Willing To Pay More
Health Care PackagingThe Shifting Sustainability Model

LA TIMES HIGHLIGHTS SUSTAINABLE COMPANIES

We love to see articles like this: examining various companies in a range of industries leading the way in providing sustainable choices. From prepared meal delivery to household goods to computers, they’ve highlighted some of the best. Thanks, LAT!

Los Angeles TimesWant Way Less Plastic Packaging In Your Deliveries? Order From These Brands

BIOPLASTICS HAVE ROOM FOR GROWTH

But it is not all good news, as there are many ways to measure an industry. Clarivate Analytics examines innovation, including looking at patent volume. They find that based on patent and trademark filings, the bioplastics industry is “not fast growing,” while “there is no shortage of exciting bioplastics innovations.” Take a deeper look at their findings here.

Clarivate Analytics PlcBioplastics Innovation Report

ICYMI: GET YOUR POPCORN READY

We’ve talked about it in these pages before, but the documentary The Story of Plastics is appointment viewing. Links to watch it below. Meanwhile, the often-conservative-leaning Wall Street Journal reviews the film, with their review noting the importance of personal responsibility. We believe it’s a film you need to see.

The Story of PlasticsHow to watch it
The Wall Street Journal‘The Story Of Plastic’ Review: Putting The Earth In Our Hands

CORAL REEFS MADE FROM PLANT BASED PRODUCTS

We’ve all heard the awful stories of bleached and dying coral reefs, a result of rising ocean temperatures from global warming. Corals are intricate, complex natural structures, but now, scientists have replicated them, “using a 3D bioprinting technique capable of mimicking functional and structural traits of the coral-algal symbiosis.” Plant-based products might help rescue our oceans in more than one way.

3D PrintFabricating Bionic Corals Could Improve Bioenergy And Coral Reefs



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