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PBPC Newsletter June 3, 2020


Welcome to the Plant Based Products Council Newsletter! Read on for the latest in PBPC news and activities, as well as some of the amazing innovations, trends, and developments happening right now in the sustainability and bioeconomy world! If you missed our last edition, check it out using the link below. 

PBPC Newsletter May 20, 2020

PBPC’S NEWEST MEMBERS

PBPC is always on the look-out for forward-thinking businesses to join its ranks. Recently, we welcomed a number of exciting new members from all across the plant-based supply chain, including Hexas Biomass, Tortuga Bioplastics, Plastic Suppliers, Crystal Pack, Green & Associates, Joe’s Garage Coffee, Bait Tefilah, Twin Rivers Technologies, Rebundle, and Tethis, Inc. See our full membership listing here.

If your company is not yet a member of PBPC, and you’re interested in learning more: Click Here

PBPC SETS GIZMODO STRAIGHT ON BIOPLASTICS

This week, we’re resuming our media accountability efforts with a blog entry in response to criticism of bioplastics from Gizmodo in this March article. PBPCunderstands that any new and innovative idea is bound to be met with criticism, and welcomes a good-faith discussion of those critiques. But these pessimistic takes continue to ignore what groups like PBPC are doing to foster an environment that will enable the realization of the full potential of these innovative products.

PBPCWith The Right Mindset, Bioplastics Can Be Part of the Solution

EPA CAN ENABLE US BIOECONOMY GROWTH WITH RULE CHANGE

During a recent Congressional hearing, the EPA’s Administrator said the agency would take a year or more before it would address a rule tied to the carbon emissions from the processing of agricultural crops, inhibiting growth of the plant-based products industry. The Biogenic CO2 Coalition, of which PBPC is a member, believes that delay is unnecessary and is asking EPA to reconsider, as it has already developed a similar rule for emissions from woody biomass. Without this regulatory fix, the US bioeconomy is hobbled. 

Biogenic CO2 Coalition VideoWatch it here
Inside EPAFarm Groups Surprised By Wheeler’s Biomass Permitting Plan
Ethanol Producer MagazineBiogenic CO2 Coalition Asks EPA To Reconsider Delay In Rulemaking

TWO REVOLUTIONARY PLANT-BASED BOTTLE TECHNOLOGIES 

One breaks down in a year, the other is edible. First, Avantium is building plant-based bottles able to hold carbonated beverages like soda and beer but “which will also break down in as little as a year in a composter or three years if left exposed to the elements.” Coca Cola and Carlsberg are cooperating with Avantium to develop the cardboard packages which are lined with plant-based plastic. The plant-based sugars will be sourced from corn, wheat, or beets for now, and perhaps agricultural waste in the future. Second, Notpla has created edible bottles, made from seaweed. While they have a shorter shelf life, they are perfect for festivals, sporting events and concerts.

Clean TechnicaPlant-Based Bottles Could Degrade In One Year
The GuardianNew Plant-Based Bottles Will Degrade In A Year
Thomas NetCould Edible Water Bottles Soon Replace Plastic Options?

SIGNS OF INDUSTRY PROGRESS IN CORPORATE ANNOUNCEMENTS

Companies must lead the way – providing the responsible and sustainable products and packaging consumers demand. Check out these innovations from Pernod Ricard (home of Absolut Vodka) and Dell, which is packaging its new line of laptops 100% sustainably. We also love Perrier’s new program to support packaging innovation. And sometimes the smallest changes can have enormous impact, like Barilla’s. Read about them below. 

EdiePernod Ricard To Phase-Out Single-Use Plastics By 2021
Environmental LeaderDell Introduces New Laptops In Sustainably-Sourced Packaging
Packaging EuropeBringing In The New: Perrier And The Next Packaging Movement
GrocerBarilla Removes Plastic Windows From Pasta Packs

FEEDSTOCK FANTASTIC

What do brown seaweed, cheese waste and almond shells all have in common? They are all feedstocks for new bioproducts. Congratulations, Notpla (seaweed), YPACK (cheese whey and almonds), and Hexion investigating how lignin from plants can be turned into material for resins and insulating foams.

Marketing WeekMeet The Startup Tackling Plastic Waste With Seaweed
News-MedicalNew Biodegradable Food Packaging Prolongs Food Shelf Life
PHYSPlant’s Lignin Could Help Shift From Plastics

NEWS TO HARDEN YOUR RESOLVE …

Unfortunately, it seems in each newsletter there is a new scientific study that highlights the dangers of plastics in our environment. In this issue, scientists tell us that blue mussels, which we eat as seafood, ingest triple the amount of the microplastic when they form reefs. Other researchers find microplastics in birds of prey, suggesting they move up the food chain to apex predators. And a third team estimates microplastic ocean counts are missing the mark.

New AtlasMussels Ingest Triple The Plastic
PHYSStudy Finds Microplastics In Florida’s Birds Of Prey For First Time
NewsweekMicroplastics In The Ocean May Be Vastly Underestimated, With Up To 125 Trillion Particles Floating Around, Study Says

BUT PLASTIC ISN’T ALWAYS THE UNDERLYING PROBLEM

Not a headline you expected to see here, I’ll bet. Check out this great article about the need for clean water in many under-developed countries. There, plastic bottles are of course a concern, but they are a symptom of a deeper issue — the lack of clean drinking water.

 The Guardian: Improve Water Supply In Poorer Nations To Cut Plastic Use, Say Experts

CIRCULAR ECONOMY NEWS

We’re rooting for advances in the circular economy, ensuring that products — and especially plastic – find a second life as new, value-added materials through recycling or repurposing. Europe is making such advances, per Recycling Magazine. While a second article looks at whether fuels can and should be made from plastic waste. Problems with converting plastic to energy haven’t disappeared, though, including the need for massive amounts of energy to break the plastic apart at the molecular level.

Recycling MagazineEuropean Project Makes Plastic Production Circular
Deutsche WelleDo Fuels Made From Plastic Make Eco Sense?



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