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PBPC Newsletter October 17, 2019


PBPC Newsletter

October 17, 2019

Welcome to the Plant-Based Products Council Newsletter! Read on for the latest in PBPC news and activities, as well as some of the amazing innovations, trends, and developments happening right now in the sustainability and bioeconomy world! If you missed our last edition, check it out using the link below.

PBPC Newsletter October 2, 2019

 

ADVISORY MEMBER NEWS: GREENBLUE DEVELOPING NEW RECYCLING STANDARD

GreenBlue is creating a new Recycled Material Standard (RMS), meant to serve as a voluntary, market-based tool to address recycling challenges of packaging materials. The new benchmarks are designed (1) to drive adoption of certified material for common packing and also (2) to support investment in new capacity for processing recycled materials. The organization will tackle standards for plastic first, helping to boost the circular economy and retain value in recycled materials.

Recycling Today: GreenBlue Develops Recycled Material Standard

 

MEMBER NEWS: CARGILL SLASHES PLASTIC CONTENT FROM ITS BOTTLES

Through new bottling technology, operating standards and packaging decisions, Cargill announced it will reduce the amount of plastic used in its vegetable oil bottles and containers by over 2.5 million pounds.

Packaging Insights: Cargill Slashes 1200 Tons Of Plastic From Its Vegetable Oil Bottles

 

A CONSUMER POLL RAISES RED FLAGS

Again and again American consumers tell us they want to buy sustainable. This poll confirms those results, but delivers troubling news as well, finding 70% of Republicans and 80% of Democrats polled said they try to make sustainable choices. But almost half (48%) cited convenience and a lack of awareness or ability as barriers to doing better. Click the link to read other statistics of concern.

Our work on these matters is just beginning. We want to hear from you on how we can help position PBPC to address these efforts.

TreeHugger: U.S. Consumers Are Baffled By How To Shop More Sustainably
Architectural Digest: Consumers Want To Buy Sustainably, But They Often Don’t

 

WHAT WE’RE UP AGAINST

We were all disappointed in the outcome of the recent California legislative session, when bills focused on sustainability and fighting plastic pollution were not passed. Here’s a revealing story behind the effort to kill them – how a plastics manufacturer launched a secretive non-profit, which lobbied on behalf of the plastics industry with troubling tactics and misleading information.

San Francisco Chronicle: How Industry ‘Environmental’ Group Helped Foil California’s Plastics Crackdown

 

GROCERIES CAN DO BETTER ON PLASTIC WASTE

Supermarkets, which must keep products safe during shipping and fresh for consumers, are a major source of plastic waste and also food waste. This article examines the problem and also the “growing breed of ‘zero-waste’ grocers.” One important solution: moving to compostable packaging so waste and food waste can be delivered to local composters and turned into healthy soil, instead of simply becoming landfill.

Vox: Plastic Waste Is Everywhere In Grocery Stores. Can They Cut Down?

 

THE FLEXIBILITY OF FEEDSTOCKS

With each passing newsletter we think to ourselves, “Surely we have already seen every possible combination of plant-based feedstock and end-user product that could replace plastic.” And every week, we are wrong. Allow us to present: a feedstock made from spider silk and wood; an edible bottle for whiskey, made from seaweed; and a variety of housing materials made from soy.

Salon Magazine: A New Material Made Of Spider Silk And Wood Could Replace Plastic
Forbes: The Startup Behind The Viral Whisky Capsules Wants To Make Plastic Packaging Disappear
United Soybean Board: The House That Soy Built: Soy-Based Products Are on the Leading Edge of Sustainable Housing

 

BUSINESSES FINDING WAYS TO PUT THE PLANET FIRST

Positive steps toward better stewardship of the earth deserve our recognition and praise. Here are just a few of the companies that caught our eye – making an effort to address some of our largest sustainability challenges, from plastic waste to reuse to the planting of trees in regions that need them most. Thanks Unilever, Lego, Dasani, Timberland and Burger King.

Fast Company: Unilever Plans To Dramatically Slash Its Use Of Plastic
Forbes: Lego’s Latest Green Initiative Wants To Put Old Bricks To New Use
Pro Food World: Dasani Uncaps A Record Number Of More-Sustainable Packaging Options
Forbes: Purpose At Work: How Timberland Is Planting A Climate Change Movement
Delish: Burger King’s Kids Meals Will No Longer Come With Plastic Toys

 

CIRCULAR ECONOMY NEWS

Composting and plant-based plastics are one essential solution to our plastic waste problem, but they are not the only solution – the problem is simply too large. That’s why we also applaud efforts to increase efficiency in plastic circularity, ensuring that less plastic pollutes our oceans and instead finds value through recycling and reuse.

Packaging Gateway: 100 Partners Sign Circular Plastics Alliance Declaration in Europe
HuffPost: New Recycling Program In Pennsylvania Wants To Save Tons Of Plastics From Landfills
Fast Company: This New HP Laptop Is The First Computer To Use Ocean-Bound Plastic
Geek.com: These New Coca-Cola Bottles Are Made From Marine Plastic



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