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PBPC Newsletter January 23, 2020


Welcome to the Plant Based Products Council Newsletter! Read on for the latest in PBPC news and activities, as well as some of the amazing innovations, trends, and developments happening right now in the sustainability and bioeconomy world! If you missed our last edition, check it out using the link below.

PBPC Newsletter January 9, 2020

PBPC ACCOUNTABILITY BLOG EXAMINES LA TIMES EDITORIAL RE: COMPOSTABLE PLASTIC

PBPC’s Accountability Blog takes a deep dive on the Los Angeles Times’editorial on compostable plastic. While the editorial board supports the state law currently under consideration to phase out single use plastic that’s not recycled or compostable – an initiative PBPC supports – the editorial raises concerns about composting infrastructure and labeling. In fact, these are concerns PBPC shares and is working to address.

PBPC Accountability Blog: Hey LA Times, PBPC is on it!

PBPC MEMBERS & FRIENDS DOING GOOD AND MAKING HEADLINES

What a great few weeks for our members. First, Loliware captures $6M in a seed round of funding. Loliware turns ocean kelp into straws that feel like plastic but degrade (and not in your drink!). Meanwhile, ADM has launched a new partnership to turn more plants into renewable chemicals. ADM had already launched a 2018 partnership with DuPont, opening a bio-based production facility. And finally, an Ellen MacArthur Foundation partnership helps companies answer questions about their circularity efforts.

Tech CrunchLoliware’s Kelp-Based Plastic Alternatives Snag $6M Seed Round From Eco-Conscious Investors

Press ReleaseADM, P2 Science Collaborate On Plant-Based Chemistry
GreenBizNew Tool From Ellen Macarthur Foundation Aims To Help Companies Measure Circularity

US BIOECONOMY “STRONG” SAYS NATIONAL ACADEMIES OF SCIENCE, ENGINEERING, & MEDICINE

A new report calls the US the “clear leader” in the global bioeconomy, but examines a number of serious challenges and makes policy recommendations the nation should consider to maintain its position.National Academies Of Science, Engineering, & MedicineU.S. Bioeconomy Is Strong, But Faces Challenges; Expanded Efforts In Coordination, Talent, Security, And Fundamental Research Are Needed

CEO OF DOW ON PLASTIC WASTE

The CEO of Dow Inc., Jim Fitterling, writes in this op-ed that plastics are a paradox: both indispensable and also “a carbon and climate change issue, a social issue, and a circular economy issue.” Dow of course is one of the world’s largest producers of plastics. He notes that carbon emissions are a serious and real consequence of plastic production and that “manufacturing does not yet have low-carbon abatement options to significantly reduce emissions at the front end of the process.” Finally, while we disagree with some of his points, he does agree with PBPC in writing, “There isn’t simply one solution…we’ll need multiple solutions” to the plastic problem and he includes bio-based materials as one solution. 

World Economic Forum (Op-Ed)Our Indispensable Problem: The Paradox Of Modern PlasticsBiden Says Plastic Bags Should Be Phased Out

PRODUCTS WE LOVE

From 3-D ink made from agribusiness food waste to a bio-based case to protect your iPhone to a water-soluble foam packaging made from plants, we continue to be awed by the creativity and ingenuity of the bio-based consumer products industry. And we tip our hat to Perdue, for choosing to utilize KTM Industries’ Green Cell Foam packaging (which is also compostable) across its ecommerce channels. Check out the Packaging Digest interview with Perdue for details about how large companies come to the decision to use bio-based materials.

Innovation OriginsFood Waste As Raw Material For 3D Printed Bioplastics
Biofuels DigestClumsy Consumers Can Still Be Eco-Friendly With Plant-Based iPhone Case

Packaging DigestPerdue Chooses Dissolvable Foam For Ecommerce Packaging

Waste AdvantageFoam Packaging That Dissolves In Your Sink Is The Next Big Thing

PACKAGING PLEDGES

Pressure continues to build on companies that utilize plastic packaging to consider how to be more environmentally friendly. The Wall Street Journaladdresses these trends, examining Nestlé SA’s pledge to cut its use of plastic from fossil fuels and its promise to invest up to 2 billion Swiss francs ($2.08 billion) to find more recycled material.  250 million francs have been earmarked by Nestlé for investments in startups researching new materials, refill systems and recycling technologies. Taco Bell recently got on board as well, pledging to move to compostable and recyclable packaging by 2025.

Wall Street JournalNestlé Tries To Tackle Big Food’s Plastic Problem
Restaurant DiveTaco Bell Wants Compostable, Recyclable Packaging By 2025

HOW ANTI-PLASTIC ACTIVISTS USE IMAGERY TO CHANGE MINDS

A new study is out assessing the power of imagery to connect emotionally with the public and then change behavior. Perhaps more importantly, this study specifically looks at the success of activists fighting plastic pollution. The study examines how to change negative emotions (connected with shocking imagery of plastic pollution) into positive emotion and action.

University Of Surrey: Activists Use Shocking Social Media Imagery To Inspire Action In The Fight Against Plastic PollutionReebok Sprints To Sustainability With Vegan Shoes

NEW YORK’S GARBAGE & RECYCLING CHALLENGES

With two Democratic presidential candidates from New York City, Politico offers a series of stories on the continuing municipal waste challenges associated with the nation’s largest city. The pieces also examine Bloomberg’s and de Blasio’s recent pledges to fix it.

Politico: Wasted Potential: Full Series On The Failures Of New York City’s Recycling Program



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