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PBPC Newsletter August 29, 2019


PBPC Newsletter

August 29, 2019

Welcome to the Plant-Based Products Council Newsletter! Read on for the latest in PBPC news and activities, as well as some of the amazing innovations, trends, and developments happening right now in the sustainability and bioeconomy world! If you missed our last edition, check it out using the link below.

 

EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW: A LEADER IN COMPOSTING

Composting closes the loop on the circular bioeconomy for plant-based products and helps sequester carbon. We sat down with staff from the largest municipal food scrap composting facility on the east coast (in Maryland) to learn more about the key role composting plays in our value chain.

Check out our interview with Denice Curry of the Recycling – Resource Recovery Division of Prince George’s County, Department of the Environment.

 

PBPC & ENVIRONMENTAL LAW INSTITUTE – UPCOMING SEMINAR

This Wednesday (9/5/19), we’re teaming up with our friends over at Environmental Law Institute (ELI) to host a seminar focused on bioplastics as a solution to pollution. Join us for an exploration of the benefits and challenges of an emerging and potentially transformative technology.

Speakers at this event include representatives from the Center for International Environmental Law, Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), University of Maryland’s Center for Social Value Creation, and Biopak Pty Ltd.

Join us for a great educational event to learn more about bioplastics!

Event Page: https://bit.ly/2Kv4hc6

Online Registration Here: https://bit.ly/2ZvtDA9

 

HARVARD BUSINESS REVIEW CONTINUES TO GO BIG ON SUSTAINABILITY STUDIES

Certain publications have an outsized impact on their audience because of their respected and authoritative voice on specific issues.

In the first piece below, researchers examined how companies can use a number of behavioral science influenced communication and marketing strategies to encourage consumers to purchase sustainable products and create sustainable habits.

In the second piece, researchers undertook the largest-ever survey of institutional investors on sustainability issues. They interviewed 70 senior executives at 43 global firms, including giant pension funds and the world’s three largest asset managers. Their survey found, “ESG was almost universally top of mind for these executives…Most of the investment leaders in our study described meaningful steps their firms are taking to integrate sustainability issues into their investing criteria. It was clear to us that corporate leaders will soon be held accountable by shareholders for ESG performance—if they aren’t already.”

Harvard Business Review, July/August: The Elusive Green Consumer
Harvard Business Review, May/June: The Investor Revolution(Op-Ed) What Will It Take To Break Our Plastic Addiction?

 

ORGANIZATIONS EARNING OUR ATTENTION AND APPLAUSE FOR SUSTAINABILITY

From corporate giants Unilever and Dasani to a local restaurant in California, everyone is examining their plastic use and pledging to find ways to reduce it. Even the Business Roundtable, a DC-based trade association representing many of the nation’s largest corporations, joined the fray. The BRT offered a new mission statement for American CEOs, turning away from an exclusive focus on shareholder value to a broader set of goals, which includes making and using sustainable products and resources to protect the environment.

THIS IS WHY WE’RE HERE

Stories like those below – which illustrate the many ways plastics harm our environment – fuel our commitment to the plant-based agenda and cause us to redouble our efforts.

 

ADVANCES IN FEEDSTOCKS, PRODUCTS AND MATERIALS

Scientific progress and innovators’ ingenuity are the foundation of our industry – delivering the latest sustainable ideas and goods. From government grants to research labs to investigative fieldwork, here are the project and people leading the way.

 

THE CIRCULAR ECONOMY

Despite the amazing and exciting advances noted in the section above, plant-based products are just one solution, and will never entirely replace petroleum-based plastics. As a result, we need to be pursuing multiple solutions and ensure petroleum-based plastics retain as much value as possible, instead of being treated as waste. The following stories show us how.



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